Pages:

shot August 20, 2013 at 08:36PM



shot August 20, 2013 at 08:36PM

Nov 4

shot August 07, 2013 at 08:56AM



shot August 07, 2013 at 08:56AM

Nov 4

shot August 04, 2013 at 06:01PM



shot August 04, 2013 at 06:01PM

Nov 4

shot August 04, 2013 at 06:02PM



shot August 04, 2013 at 06:02PM

Nov 4

shot August 04, 2013 at 06:05PM



shot August 04, 2013 at 06:05PM

Nov 4

shot August 04, 2013 at 06:10PM



shot August 04, 2013 at 06:10PM

Nov 4

shot July 29, 2013 at 11:04AM



shot July 29, 2013 at 11:04AM

Nov 4

“I work in digital publishing and I love what I do. Yet for fun, I “play videogames” as much as I…”

“I work in digital publishing and I love what I do. Yet for fun, I “play videogames” as much as I “read books.” This still carries a stigma, as if I’m wasting my time with idle pursuits instead of bettering myself through literature. The fact is, a lot of the books I read are kinda trashy, but most of the games I play are pretty good. I like to play videogames and read books, but more than that, I like to play videogames that are like books.”

-

Wordplay — I.M.H.O. — Medium

A short round-up of a few interesting narrative games. With thanks to @rogre.

Nov 4

“One day you are putting numbers into spreadsheet cells, and the next those numbers feed into…”

“One day you are putting numbers into spreadsheet cells, and the next those numbers feed into budgets, and the budgets turn into requests to Human Resources, which turn into postings on Stack Overflow and requests to outsourcing placement firms in Estonia or Mumbai, and these turn into human beings doing things, sometimes in Offices, or at home, or in home offices. Just one number in a cell in Excel, plus human beings with checkbooks, and suddenly you’ve created an absence that must be filled. Houses are sold and bought. Kids have to move from their schools and attend new schools.”

-

Paul Ford, Deliverables

Words are things. Information is mass in another form.

(via quartey)

Nov 3

“Time doesn’t exist, not in a way that matters to most people. The story we tell ourselves…”

“Time doesn’t exist, not in a way that matters to most people. The story we tell ourselves about time, though, is the overriding narrative of our day to day lives.”

- Seth’s Blog: Time doesn’t exist until we invent it
Nov 2

Introducing the new Livescribe 3 smartpen (US) (by…



Introducing the new Livescribe 3 smartpen (US) (by Livescribe)

Write poem longhand, instant conversion to digital text. Two things to scrutinise: text recognition (I’ll be the first to admit that my handwriting sucks these days) and writing experience (that nib doesn’t look particularly dainty). That said, one for the Christmas wish list?

Nov 1

D.O.R.T.H.E. (by Lasse Munk) “Created by Lasse Munk and Søren…



D.O.R.T.H.E. (by Lasse Munk)

"Created by Lasse Munk and Søren Andreasen, D.O.R.T.H.E. is a system of re-cycled components and a max/msp patch that creates music from thoughts written in the form of words and sentences. The system is built to control a number of mechanical machines build almost entirely out of $300 worth scrap electronics sourced from a junkyard.

"Using the typewriter as the main input, D.O.R.T.H.E. reuses words by analysing them. It uses varied algorithms to for example map number of letters in a word to a pitch in music, but also identity things like emotional states like joy, distress, happiness, discomfort and fear in text."

Project page here at soundjuggling.com. What kind of music would a poem make? Hm…

Oct 31

“My theory is that the creative mind approaches task management in a way David Allen, and the…”

“My theory is that the creative mind approaches task management in a way David Allen, and the developers of most GTD-related apps, never accommodated in their methodologies. In short, I believe productivity methodologies themselves only aid Resistance.”

-

Rethinking Productivity for Creatives — CJ Chilvers

Yes, I’ve been known to recommend a number of different productivity tools. And yes, I’ve been known to float from system to system— not so much in search of productivity nirvana, but more trying to stay true to whichever best fit my way of thinking at that point in time. I’m currently somewhere between Things and iThoughts (which is really a mind-mapping tool, but is robust enough to manage tasks, and there’s something about the ability to a) manipulate my workload via touch and b) see how it’s all connected that I find useful right now…) - and I just found an attractive new kid on the block (Gneo) that syncs via Evernote…

At the end of the day, it’s all a matter of what works best for you. Although there’s some good general advice about managing the workload, and some general principles that we should probably all pay attention to, there is no one true path to take when it comes to getting things done.

Oct 30

humansofnewyork: “I’m working on my PhD in English, with a…



humansofnewyork:

"I’m working on my PhD in English, with a focus on poetry."
“So how would you define a good poem?”
“It’s a good poem if I’m a different person when I’m finished reading it.”

Amen

Oct 29

It seems the default state is busy at the moment. You know the…



It seems the default state is busy at the moment. You know the deal: too many things, too little time. Haven’t been shooting much recently, even with the iPhone (as reflected by the lack of updates through my Instagram account and ‘For Then and Ever More’), and that’s when I know I’m not being mindful or reflective enough. Even so, news this weekend that one of my VSCO images made it into the curated grid put a nice little smile on my face. There’s a wealth of beautiful imagery there, so the selection comes as a welcome reminder to take a breath and a few more pictures each day.

If you have an iPhone and don’t already know, VSCO is pretty much the Vimeo of mobile photography, where Instagram = YouTube. ‘Nuff said.

Oct 28

Currently in a #BARPo session led by South African guest…



Currently in a #BARPo session led by South African guest @nomadpoet Toni Stuart. “You create the path by walking it” - truth. #vscocam

Oct 26

“My uncle is skinning peaches for cobbler because I stink like city, he says, like iron and exhaust…

"My uncle is skinning peaches for cobbler because I stink like city, he says, like iron and exhaust and a girl should know the taste of something with the sun still inside it, because when I leave this house and go back to my mama and she breathes me in

he wants me to smell like she used to, like dirt. The peach is spurting juice down his wrists and onto the counter. He fingers the veins in the pit, says eat one, you’ll grow a tree inside you, your mama had one once but she tore it up, killed it good, took you south.”

Skinned, by Katie Knoll - follow the link to read the poem in its entirety.

Oct 22

SADLY BY YOUR SIDE (by Fabrica) Love it and the possibilities…



SADLY BY YOUR SIDE (by Fabrica)

Love it and the possibilities it suggests. Imagine a poetry collection rendered as an app in a similar way— how interacting with the environment through camera or mic could change your experience of of the text or audio of the poems offered to you… 

It’s relatively easy to generate audio in respond to visual input, but meaningful text? Would the app be a generative application (i.e. text generated dynamically in response to input) or more simply interactive, offering pre-recorded content in response to specific conditions. Some kind of middle ground? An algorithm that could recombine segments of text in response to audio/visual stimulus, where the relationship between the bodies of text would be the dynamically produced output? Sounds exciting to me. 

Oct 19

“Recognising that different language registers are used in different contexts is important. Enabling…”

“Recognising that different language registers are used in different contexts is important. Enabling access to higher education, whilst not the only purpose of educating children, is an important one. However, I am unconvinced that listing banned words is the way forward.”

-

Hip-Hop Teacher: But it’s just a dialect that I select when I hang…

Agreed. Awareness is key. Is banning slang the best or only way to promote an awareness of the value of different modes of language in young people? As someone who works with young people and words (mostly through poetry) I’m always pushing for the people I work with to extend their vocabulary, and to develop their sense of the most appropriate voice/language/tone for a particular task or setting. With this in mind, I appreciate the sentiment at work behind pushing those young people beyond the slang they might default to.

That said, a large part of my work in my role as educator consists of helping young people find value in their own voices, to craft and construct beautiful and/or compelling pieces of work from the things they know, to know that they, too, can have authority, that their voices have a place in the world beyond the world they call their own. Those two ideals do not exclude each other. I’d like to think that my practise is based on inclusion, rather than exclusion.

Of course, it’s always a good exercise to at least attempt to see the other side of an issue like this. While it’s not surprising that the notion of a school banning slang has met with a great deal of scorn in the (social) media, I’m reminded that there are certain editing challenges I set for some of my students that limit the use of specific vocabulary in order to push the range of their writing, and by extension how they think about the way they use language. “Try to write this piece without any adjectives… remove all abstract nouns… say whatever it is you feel needs to be said in no more than 14 lines…” and so on. Granted, the kinds of editing challenges we (teaching poets and educators) roll out key into far fewer contentious issues than a school-wide ban on a particular mode of communication, but it could be argued that there’s a common goal at work between the two different instances of enforced limitation…

Oct 18

“As we get older, life seems to fly by faster and faster. That’s because we structure our…”

“As we get older, life seems to fly by faster and faster. That’s because we structure our experience of time around memories. We remember events in relation to other events. But as we get older, and our experiences become less unique, our memories can blend together. If yesterday’s lunch is indistinguishable from the one you ate the day before, it’ll end up being forgotten. That’s why it’s so hard to remember meals. In the same way, if you’re not doing things that are unique and different and memorable, this year can come to resemble the last, and end up being just as forgettable as yesterday’s lunch. That’s why it’s so important to pack your life with interesting experiences that make your life memorable, and provide a texture to the passage of time.”

- Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything: Joshua Foer: 9781594135316: Amazon.com: Books
Oct 17