“We are, in the deepest sense, responsible for ourselves. We are, as Sartre put it, the authors of…”

“We are, in the deepest sense, responsible for ourselves. We are, as Sartre put it, the authors of ourselves. Through the accretion of our choices, our actions, and our failures to act, we ultimately design ourselves. We cannot avoid this responsibility, this freedom. In Sartre’s terms, ‘we are condemned to freedom.’”

Irvin D. Yalom, The Gift of Therapy: An Open Letter to a New Generation of Therapists and Their Patients (via creatingaquietmind)

“A poet is not defined by her production, but the poetry always reveals a truth about the poet.”

“A poet is not defined by her production, but the poetry always reveals a truth about the poet.”

Joey De Jesus, for Amy King’s “Young Poets Bare All: What Is a Culture?” (via bostonpoetryslam)

Hi Jacob! How did you find Singapore? Were you there for work?

Singapore is always (consistently) good to/for me. I consider myself fortunate to have been able to spend so much time there, and to have returned so frequently. And my experience of Singapore is largely based on the people I’ve met while I’ve been there— poets, students, teachers and more. I look forward to my next visit!

“…line breaks have everything to do with doubt. That’s why poetry is so different from prose, because…”

“…line breaks have everything to do with doubt. That’s why poetry is so different from prose, because it’s infused with doubt. At the moment of a line break, even if it’s for a millisecond, you’re thrust into doubt; you’re thrust into a place where you’re not certain what just happened or what’s going to happen. Only faith that the next line will land us on solid ground is what keeps us breathing.”

Jericho Brown, from his essay The Possibility of God  (via kathleenjoy)

“To save time, take time in large pieces. Do not cut time up into bits…The mind is like a locomotive….”

“To save time, take time in large pieces. Do not cut time up into bits…The mind is like a locomotive. It requires time for getting under headway. Under headway it makes its own steam. Progress gives force as force makes progress. Do not slow down as long as you run well and without undue waste. Take advantage of momentum. Prolonged thinking leads to profound thinking.”

Charles Franklin Thwing (via Cal Newport)

“The work of a professional isn’t to recreate thrills. It’s to show up and do the work….”

The work of a professional isn’t to recreate thrills. It’s to show up and do the work. To continue the journey you set out on a while ago. To make the change you seek to make in the universe.

Thrilling is fine. Mattering is more important.

Seth’s Blog: The thrill is gone

(via Solar Bears – Wild Flowers)

(via Solar Bears – Wild Flowers)

“The thing about writing is – I reckon – that it requires a lot of space where you don’t write. You…”

“The thing about writing is – I reckon – that it requires a lot of space where you don’t write. You think about nothing or one very small part of a poem you aren’t happy with. Hours go by, days go by. You put on a CD. You read half a book. You walk into the next room and forget why you did. You walk back. A week goes by. A year. Then you join the French Foreign Legion.”

A week goes by. A year | EYELASHROAMING

“Being watched qualifies us for the more specific forms of recognition that build our reputation and…”

“Being watched qualifies us for the more specific forms of recognition that build our reputation and establish our economic viability. But the attention we experience as support and opportunity is also the data that sustains surveillance systems. We become complicit in surveillance’s productivity, tracking ourselves and others, recognizing each other within spaces of capture. We want to be seen and want to control how we are seen, but we accept that one can come only at the expense of the other.”

Surveillance notes

So how do you feel about that Beyonce video?

This: “Look at how hands move, in the official video. There’s the interplay of the Raised Hands: In the church scenes we see hands raised in praise and surrender to the God of that church; these are interspersed with shots of the extraordinarily sharp double edge of what appears to be a 12 year old black boy* dancing as hard and as well as he can in front of a row of white police officers decked out in riot gear. As the boy dances harder and harder, the praise in the church reaches a pitch, and as the congregation throws their hands up, again, in surrender, the police throw their hands up to the boy. Surrender and praise, intertwined. The recognition of something more powerful, more perfect, something worth surrendering to.”

(via http://www.erismag.com/blog/2016/2/9/magickofbeyonce)

And this: “If I learned one thing this week, it is that we are starving to see ourselves in power. We yearn to celebrate the vision of it–even when we know it is a ploy, a hologram. Our hunger, no matter how potent, no matter how righteous, cannot transfigure pop stars into revolutionaries. It cannot supplement community power with what it manages to extract from corporate media.”

(via http://radfag.com/2016/02/10/my-apparently-obligatory-response-to-formation-in-list-form/)

“I let myself get so tangled in chains of internet services that I can now accidentally commit public…”

“I let myself get so tangled in chains of internet services that I can now accidentally commit public speech in my sleep.”

Foiled By The Little Voices | MORNING, COMPUTER

So sayeth Warren Ellis. Got me thinking about my own in-and-out relationship with social media (for the last year or so), signal to noise ratios, and how our constructed selves overlap but aren’t necessarily directly driven by our actual selves. If it’s hard enough for us to see our actual selves for what they truly are, how accurately can we determine the way our constructed selves may be received by our “audiences”? And how much effort do we invest in wilful obfuscation/misdirection, in spite of ourselves?

Tim Aminov – “One Lone Survivor (Feat. Pete…

Tim Aminov – “One Lone Survivor (Feat. Pete Josef)”

I haven’t paid any attention to music videos for a while. Because time. There are only so many channels I can keep up with, and my disposable hours are increasingly limited. Of course, as a child of MTV, The Box and IDTV/BET, I sacrificed more of my youth than I can quantify watching music videos, diving beyond aesthetic titlation to appreciate how epic narratives can be spun, how socio-political commentary can be invested, how layers of depth I may not have appreciated in the simple act of listening to the music can be revealed through moving image. I’ve been trying to catch up on critical analysis of Beyoncé’s ‘Formation’, and for a moment, got sucked down a rabbit-hole. Thanks, YouTube.

All this to say: the poet/photographer/human in me has completely fallen for the attached video. That is all.

“In my own work I’ve come to think about time as a form of relationality. Our stories about time tell…”

In my own work I’ve come to think about time as a form of relationality. Our stories about time tell us what is it to be with others, or to not be with them. They also tell us what kinds of forms this ‘withness’ can take. This means that time can also be seen as a form of ethical encounter. If that’s so, what are we doing when we ignore other people’s claims that they don’t have the time?

It seems that in order to treat the other ethically, you have to come to terms with your  disappointment, let go of the anticipated future you had been working with, and then still have the generosity to be able to say to the person who has somehow let you down “Of course, no problems, hope things get better for you soon”.

An Ethics of Time in Academia? – Michelle Bastian

“You go rummaging around in other people’s lives. You hear rumors and go digging for the painful…”

“You go rummaging around in other people’s lives. You hear rumors and go digging for the painful truth beneath the lovely lies. You believe you have a right to these things. But you don’t.” He looked hard at the scribe. “When someone tells you a piece of their life, they’re giving you a gift, not granting you your due.”

The Wise Man’s Fear: The Kingkiller Chronicle: Book 2 (Kingkiller Chonicles) by Patrick Rothfuss

“What can’t be replaced in any organization imaginable in the future is precisely what seems…”

“What can’t be replaced in any organization imaginable in the future is precisely what seems overlooked today: liberal arts skills, such as creativity, empathy, listening, and vision. These skills, not digital or technological ones, will hold the keys to a company’s future success. And yet companies aren’t hiring for them. This is a problem for today’s digital companies, and it’s only going to get worse.”

Digital Companies Need More Liberal Arts Majors

“There’s another part of feeds that’s potentially disconcerting: you don’t quite know how they…”

“There’s another part of feeds that’s potentially disconcerting: you don’t quite know how they operate. Facebook’s algorithm decides which items appear in your feed and which do not; its workings are mysterious and constantly being tinkered with. Apple News is predicated on learning your proclivities and creating a personalized feed just for you, but the mechanics are of course hidden. Twitter has traditionally been more transparent: you decide who to follow, and then you see everything they tweet in chronological order. But recent experiments show Twitter dabbling in more Facebook-ified feeds, where robots determine which tweets you’re most interested in or most likely to click or some other metric likely to change and certain to remain opaque. Zeynep Tufekci has written about the ways in which it seems Facebook’s algorithms downplay the Black Lives Matter movement. Invisible algos are obviously disturbing to journalists, who are right to worry that content that is challenging or politically unfavorable will be buried. But it’s similarly disturbing to users, who—like the protesters in Ferguson—may have their own messages to distribute, and who cannot know how the algo is attempting to manipulate them, nor predict how their own identity is transmitted to others.”

Follow the links | A Working Library

“Every exercise of the voice is a work of fantasy, even and especially where it is simple and…”

“Every exercise of the voice is a work of fantasy, even and especially where it is simple and straightforward reality. Even where I simply employ my voice, to ask for a ticket or tell somebody the time, I am confirming the capacity of my voice to make the world in sound. The voice is the physical confirmation of my fantasy – that is no less a fantasy for being the plain truth – that I can bring about effects in the world simply by using my voice. The choral voice is an amplification of this fantasy into the fantasy of amplification itself. ‘The voice is the body’s greatest power of emanation’, Guy Rosolato writes (Rosolato 1974, 76; my translation). But chorality is that emanation raised to the second power; if my voice is that which goes beyond me, then the choral voice is the voice that goes beyond itself. It is the voice as pure amplitude, having the power both to adhere to other voices and to swell excitably like a kind of inflammation. It is not just the body’s power of emanation, it is emanation’s power to grow into a kind of hyper-body.”

Choralities – Steven Connor

Consider this in relation to the authoring and performance of the group poem. So much to consider and experiment with…

“It’s true, however, that HTML originally lacked a way to present images. It took Marc Andreesen…”

“It’s true, however, that HTML originally lacked a way to present images. It took Marc Andreesen (yes, that Marc Andreesen) introducing the img tag in Netscape Navigator for the first images to appear on the web. Video came eons later in internet years. JavaScript has been around for a while, but it’s only recently (and probably mistakenly) become a kind of necessity. Olds can remember a brief dark period where the web was mostly something called Flash; those days are best forgotten.”

Hypertext for all | A Working Library

I remember all of this…

“I’m dubious about ranking… I’m not sure about ranking. I’ve long suspected that what our descendants…”

“I’m dubious about ranking… I’m not sure about ranking. I’ve long suspected that what our descendants will find quaintest about us it that we made distinctions of that sort. That they’ll be looking back and they’ll be going, So strange they didn’t think Facebook was “real.” There’s a wonderful, weird book, the title of which I will probably be unable to remember, but it’s a collection of first-person accounts of Victorians encountering new technologies. It’s taken from diaries and letters—it’s not famous people, just ordinary people. The one that always struck me was an Anglican clergyman who went to a garden party, heard an Edison phonograph talking, and went home and wrote this completely terrifying description of this demonic, satanic, mechanical voice speaking to the children in the garden, and how this probably presaged the end of the world. He was just writing for himself, so he wasn’t exaggerating, and I thought, Oh, wow. He had this absolutely intense experience, but I don’t think I could say that what it caused him to fear came to pass.”

William Gibson: On Technophobia and the Power of Film | Literary Hub

Former BYPs Antosh Wojcik and Will Tyas have a new audio…

Former BYPs Antosh Wojcik and Will Tyas have a new audio production company: Post-Everything. Today, they’re making a podcast with current BYPs. And so the circle turns… (at Barbican Centre)