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PATTER (Notes & Stuff)

PATTER (Notes & Stuff):

Big fan of the meaningful use of Tumblr (and other such platforms) here. Kearney’s use of Tumblr to support the release of his most recent collection Patter is a masterclass. Observe…

Nov 18

robertogreco: “This is what the “internet of things” endgame…



robertogreco:

“This is what the “internet of things” endgame looks like.” —Jake Boxer

Everything is a poem…

Nov 17

“The mirror lets us watch the past, the slight delay as light batters our skin. If you look, do so…”

The mirror lets us watch the past,

the slight delay as light batters our skin. If you look,
do so kindly; what is there is what is gone.



- Jamison Crabtree, from ‘upturn the stones to draw out the night; flush the moon from out of the bushes;’ via (Thrush Poetry Journal)[http://www.thrushpoetryjournal.com/january-2014-jamison-crabtree.html]
Nov 16

melonpult: alonelycorneroftheuniverse: ex-oti-c: love…



melonpult:

alonelycorneroftheuniverse:

ex-oti-c:

love this

Do you mean metaphorical.

No, I actually meant metabolism architecture. It was a post-war movement in Japan which followed (among other things) this concept that the city was like a body – the roads were like blood vessels and the sounds of the city were the sounds of it breathing, you know, that kind of thing. The idea was that it was alive.

There were some really cool futuristic buildings that came out of it. 

Have a wiki link.

WRITING PROMPT: Consider the city (Your city? A city you’ve known?) as a living, breathing entity. You are dwarfed by it, and yet it knows you, like an absent but largely benevolent deity. What does your prayer-song for your city sound like? How has it blessed you? How has it punished you? How keen are you to remain within its embrace? How eager are you to break its gravity? What hold does(/will) it still have on you, even if you leave it behind?

Nov 15

“Project books can explore things differently, move differently, interact with readers differently. I…”

“Project books can explore things differently, move differently, interact with readers differently. I think different is important to the innovation and evolution of poetry. Yes, some people won’t write them well. But some people will. And I will never underestimate poetry or the poets who take risks.”

-

Sarah Blake on Mr. West, via The Cloudy House

For those of you working on book-length poetry “projects”.

Nov 14

“The list emerges from Sontag’s diaries as the author’s signature form. And it’s a strange form at…”

“The list emerges from Sontag’s diaries as the author’s signature form. And it’s a strange form at that: the list is a potentially infinite structure made up of distilled, often epigrammatic parts. It’s a form that expands and contracts to meet the needs of its author; it may be brief or expansive, important or ephemeral, and, in Sontag’s hands, it takes on many roles: an argument or an organizer, an aide-mémoire or a way of conferring value. The result of her “compulsion” not just to inventory but to reduce the world to a collection of scrutable parts, the list, Sontag’s archive makes clear, is always unstable, always ready to be added to or subtracted from. The list is a form of flux.”

-

Susan Sontag famously believed that lists confer value and affirm our existence. A decade after her death, as her digital archive is being made accessible to scholars and fans, the LA Review of Books examines the repercussions in a beautiful essay:

All archival labor negotiates the twin responsibilities of preservation and access.

[…]

Sontag is — serendipitously, it seems — an ideal subject for exploring the new horizon of the born-digital archive, for the tension between preservation and flux that the electronic archive renders visible is anticipated in Sontag’s own writing. Any Sontag lover knows that the author was an inveterate list-maker. 

[…]

Reading Sontag’s lists in their original e-environment brings the issues of the digital archive — with its constant push-and-pull between proliferation and deep freeze — to the surface.

[…]

We cannot see when and where Sontag added to a list, or when or where she deleted from it. There are no cross-outs, no carets, no smudges. Certain kinds of traces, familiar in more traditional archives, are absent from the digital environment.

[…]

Listing and searching both provide us with ways, however flawed, to cut through redundancy, to make meaning out of chaos, to, in Sontag’s vocabulary, confer and create “value,” even “existence.” This impulse to list, to search, or, in other words, to reduce — an impulse researchers necessarily share with Sontag herself — takes on a peculiar resonance in the context of the guarded writer’s archive

Full piece here. Complement with Sontag’s lists of likes and dislikes, illustrated

(via explore-blog)

Nov 12

Photo



Nov 10

“I try to keep the process of writing a poem low-stakes as much as I can—I try to recognize my work…”

“I try to keep the process of writing a poem low-stakes as much as I can—I try to recognize my work within the broader scope of my life and the life of the universe, which sounds hokey, but is true. The stars and the sun make writing easier—if I don’t write a poem today, does anything suffer? No, assuredly not. The sky is still there, the ground is still there, the birds still know intuitively exactly when to strike up the band. Things remain well underway. So, writing for me is a way to recognize the larger conditions of things, and my place therein, and in this thinking writing a poem is inherently a moment of joy.”

- Q&A with Eryn Green, the 2013 Winner of Yale Series of Younger Poets - Yale Press Log
Nov 10

Photo



Nov 9

“There is a vitality, a life force, an energy, a quickening that is translated through you into…”

“There is a vitality, a life force, an energy, a quickening that is translated through you into action, and because there is only one of you in all of time, this expression is unique. And if you block it, it will never exist through any other medium and it will be lost. The world will not have it. It is not your business to determine how good it is nor how valuable nor how it compares with other expressions. It is your business to keep it yours clearly and directly, to keep the channel open.”

- Martha Graham on the Hidden Danger of Comparing Yourself to Others | James Clear
Nov 9

One day, we had a family photoshoot…













One day, we had a family photoshoot…

Nov 8

A Map of the Border Between Nebraska and Iowa at Carter Lake (by…



A Map of the Border Between Nebraska and Iowa at Carter Lake (by amproehl)

WRITING PROMPT: write a poem inspired by one of the images in the collection “Maps of Strange Borders”.

Nov 8

“Try to meet a poem on its terms not yours. If you have to “relate” to a poem in order to understand…”

“Try to meet a poem on its terms not yours. If you have to “relate” to a poem in order to understand it, you aren’t reading it sufficiently. In other words, don’t try to fit the poem into your life. Try to see what world the poem creates. Then, if you are lucky, its world will help you re-see your own.”

- Reading a Poem: 20 Strategies - The Atlantic
Nov 7

“I always think about synthesis. Putting things together. Placement. Fitting. This is ‘thinking like…”

  1. I always think about synthesis. Putting things together. Placement. Fitting. This is ‘thinking like a writer’ to me.


- This Modern Writer: 100 Facts About Brian Oliu (by Brian Oliu, of course) | [PANK]
Nov 6

New form: reminder for the gogyohshi-ku and the specular…



New form: reminder for the gogyohshi-ku and the specular gogyohshi-ku. This specular gogyohshi-ku is mirrored in structure, not necessarily in content— i.e. you don’t strictly have to reverse the lines (though extra points if you do). Note: in the specular, the form begins with a reverse gogyohshi-ku, in order to begin and end with haiku.

Oct 28

“I remember that the writing of these poems was driven by some kind of dynamic source—intellectual,…”

“I remember that the writing of these poems was driven by some kind of dynamic source—intellectual, emotional, physical. If I remember that, it animates the poems, even the quieter ones. Going to hear a reader read a poem is simply not the same thing as reading it yourself. So as a poet giving a reading, I see no point in being absent from the work while presenting it live (reading in Times New Roman, I call it). That’s what the book is for. That does not mean that you have to shout, switch accents, and sing (though that’s often an honest part of the composition for me and many others)—but I think being present is necessary and audiences can tell, even when your version of present is to read without much affect.”

-

Douglas Kearney Raps, Scats, and Grows Beautiful, Thorny Horns | Poets and Writers

Note: Kearney studies “comedians to work out timing, cringe humor, and audience interaction.”

Oct 27

“Examine the lives of the best and most fruitful people and peoples and ask yourselves whether a tree…”

“Examine the lives of the best and most fruitful people and peoples and ask yourselves whether a tree that is supposed to grow to a proud height can dispense with bad weather and storms; whether misfortune and external resistance, some kinds of hatred, jealousy, stubbornness, mistrust, hardness, avarice, and violence do not belong among the favorable conditions without which any great growth even of virtue is scarcely possible.”

- Nietzsche, via Brain Pickings
Oct 26

(via We live in a world ruled by fictions of every kind – but…



(via We live in a world ruled by fictions of every kind - but does it float)

Writing prompt: write a poem that involves or arises from a bus journey. The poem should remain rooted in that journey, but can use that journey as a lens through to make comment on some larger experience.

(follow the link for further inspiration)

Oct 25

This is my iPhone. There are many like it, but this one is…



This is my iPhone. There are many like it, but this one is mine.

Dead iPhone day, today. It’s been acting up for a while— crashing and rebooting itself a good few times a day. Yesterday it got into some kind of reboot loop where it would restart every 5 minutes or so. Lovely. This morning, I managed to keep it alive for long enough to see that iOS8.1 had been released, and even long enough to download the update, hoping that would fix my ills. But I fell foul of the update process, and ended up having to “restore” — return to factory defaults.

Last backup? About a month ago. Any way to recover without restoring? Possibly, but the pain it would take… I decided it wouldn’t be such a bad thing to wipe the slate clean and start again. Set the thing up as a brand new iPhone.

It’s amazing how much we come to depend on these tools, these devices. My phone is a communication device (text, audio, video, still image), it’s my primary camera, my health/fitness tracker, my mindfulness buddy, my “first-in-hand” information access point…

I’ve already installed the apps that were instantly conspicuous by their absence: Fantastical, Accompli, Drafts, Soundcloud, Casts, Google Now, Google Maps, Reporter, Moves, Up, Daily Tracker, Instagram, VSCOcam, Pocket, Evernote, Dropbox, 1Password, TextExpander, Blinkist, Buffer and Evershaker (and yes, that list doesn’t cover even half of what I had on the phone before now). Most of these apps have some kind of “back up to cloud” capability built in (it’s one of the criteria I consider for apps that I really depend on). That said, I know I’ve got a period of inconvenience ahead— half-remembered passwords to reset, settings to tweak and all those myriad other adjustments that make this particular iPhone 5 mine. But you know what? It’s okay. It’s easy to get to a point where you take your gear for granted.

Funny how these devices are so ubiquitous now— the way you might reach for someone else’s phone until you thumb it to life and realise, by the image you’ve chosen to display on the lock screen, that it’s not yours. Most of the people I work with are Apple users— but I’m so used to my own rig that there’s always a slightly dizzying period of adjustment when I have to sit down in front of someone else’s machine. That’s not necessarily a comment on the contemporary condition. I’m a “power user”. I know my tools inside out, and I’ve fine-tuned them for my own quirks and biases. But, seen from the outside at least, I own the same hunks or slabs of metal, glass or aluminium as anyone else.

15 years ago, my peers were all aspiring to the same beige boxes. To be fair, it’s a wider field now. But just the same as any other instrument, it’s what we do with them that counts.

Oct 24

“A poem is something that happens. It is not words or characters on a page, and it is not a…”

“A poem is something that happens. It is not words or characters on a page, and it is not a performance by the artist: the artist makes the means or occasion for the poem to happen in the reader, an action spirited into being. This process from maker to work to recipient, a process so ancient it seems natural, is itself a human creation, like any other social form.”

- Robert Pinsky, via Paris Review
Oct 24