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Foreword

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Hello. I’m Jacob Sam-La Rose, and here’s what you need to know: I’m a published poet; I devise and facilitate projects for schools and other institutions, emerging poets, teachers, literature professionals and other creatives; I’m a geek for web technology and productivity; and I’m pretty handy with a camera. I exist in a few different places online – this particular site serves as my lifestream, an overview of what I’ve been doing on the interwebs. The content you see here is aggregated from:

If any of the above sparks your interest, don’t be shy in saying hello (mail at jacobsamlarose dot com).

Apr 13

Today’s list of provocations for working with students on…



Today’s list of provocations for working with students on group poems for the teachers and poets of the Spoke Word Cup 2014 programme (another day, another youth slam project…;)

Apr 24

Workshop planning with @foldingtext – timings in blue are…



Workshop planning with @foldingtext - timings in blue are auto-generated, calculated from the text based lengths of time I’ve entered at the end of each line/paragraph (see italics, auto-formatted). “Start :” line is automagically generated, and can be edited, meaning plans can be reused and refreshed simply by changing the start time. And the beauty of all of this is that it actually serves as a step by step timer. The current step is highlighted at the appropriate time, and a notification pops up on each next step. Way to stay on time during a workshop plan! At the end of the list, which you can’t see here, an end time also dynamically generated, so if you change timings on the fly, you can see the ramifications instantly.

I wouldn’t use this during every workshop— much of my facilitation is responsive, and by the time I’m in the space, I’ve already got the plan in my head. Any changes that need to be made are implemented organically, and we roll with what comes. That said, as a planning tool, this is beautiful. And it’s just one mode of a pretty stellar text editor, with todo lists, outlining, node folding, text tagging and more. So you can write poems, plan workshops and manage projects all in the same app, using plain text files that you can open on any platform in any other text editor. This just jumped to the top of my toolkit.

Apr 22

For today’s #morningreading I’m still with the Kevin…



For today’s #morningreading I’m still with the Kevin Stein (Sufficiency of the Actual). Most, if not all, of these captures have been the beginnings of longer poems. This starts as any “definition poem” might, but sustains a bold trajectory moving forward, testament to Stein’s vision and linguistic verve. If you haven’t yet been moved to investigate his work further, do yourself a favour…

Apr 21

“There is a secret bond between slowness and memory, between speed and forgetting. Consider this…”

There is a secret bond between slowness and memory, between speed and forgetting. Consider this utterly commonplace situation: a man is walking down the street. At a certain moment, he tries to recall something, but the recollection escapes him. Automatically he slows down. Meanwhile, a person who wants to forget a disagreeable
incident he has just lived through starts unconsciously to speed up his pace, as if he were trying to distance himself from a thing still too close to him in time.

In existential mathematics, that experience takes the form of two basic equations: the degree of slowness is directly proportion to the intensity of memory; the degree of speed is directly proportional to the intensity of forgetting.



- Milan Kundera, from Slowness (HarperCollins, 1996)
Apr 18

“It takes a lot of sometimes painful self-realization to figure out what that message is in the first…”

“It takes a lot of sometimes painful self-realization to figure out what that message is in the first place. It was one of the greatest adventures of my life, figuring out who I was in order to figure out who my artist-self was.”

- What I Have to Say: Cheryl Jacobs Nicolai | The Define School
Apr 17

“Our business is to see what we can do with the English language as it is. How can we combine the old…”

Our business is to see what we can do with the English language as it is. How can we combine the old words in new orders so that they survive, so that they create beauty, so that they tell the truth? That is the question.

And the person who could answer that question would deserve whatever crown of glory the world has to offer. Think what it would mean if you could teach, if you could learn, the art of writing. Why, every book, every newspaper would tell the truth, would create beauty.



- Virginia Woolf, who drowned on March 28, 1941, on the art of language and the beauty of words in the only surviving recording of her voice. (via explore-blog)
Apr 14

Poet: Raymond Antrobus; BAR Poetry @ Gallery Cafe, April 4th…



Poet: Raymond Antrobus; BAR Poetry @ Gallery Cafe, April 4th 2014

Apr 9

“For language to have meaning there must be intervals of silence somewhere, to divide word from word…”

“For language to have meaning there must be intervals of silence somewhere, to divide word from word and utterance from utterance. He who retires into silence does not necessarily hate language. Perhaps it is love and respect for language which imposes silence upon him.”

- Thomas Merton, “Disputed Questions” (via litverve)
Apr 9

Poet: Tyrone Lewis; BAR @ Gallery Cafe, April 4th 2014



Poet: Tyrone Lewis; BAR @ Gallery Cafe, April 4th 2014

Apr 8

INTERVIEWER: Wordsworth spoke of growing up “Fostered alike by beauty and by fear,” and he put fearful experiences first; but he also said that his primary subject was “the mind of Man.” Don’t you write more about the mind than about the external world?

INTERVIEWER: Wordsworth spoke of growing up “Fostered alike by beauty and by fear,” and he put fearful experiences first; but he also said that his primary subject was “the mind of Man.” Don’t you write more about the mind than about the external world?

BARTHELME: In a commonsense way, you write about the impingement of one upon the other—my subjectivity bumping into other subjectivities, or into the Prime Rate. You exist for me in my perception of you (and in some rough, Raggedy Andy way, for yourself, of course). That’s what’s curious when people say, of writers, This one’s a realist, this one’s a surrealist, this one’s a super-realist, and so forth. In fact, everybody’s a realist offering true accounts of the activity of mind. There are only realists.
Apr 8

Poet: Sophie Fenella Robinski; BAR @ Gallery Cafe, April 4th…



Poet: Sophie Fenella Robinski; BAR @ Gallery Cafe, April 4th 2014

Apr 7

“A man would do well to carry a pencil in his pocket, and write down the thoughts of the moment….”

“A man would do well to carry a pencil in his pocket, and write down the thoughts of the moment. Those that come unsought are commonly the most valuable, and should be secured, because they seldom return.”

- How we work: Francis Bacon, Elizabethan polymath - rodcorp
Apr 7

Poets: Ruth Bertulis-Fernandes and Will Tyas, BAR @ Gallery…



Poets: Ruth Bertulis-Fernandes and Will Tyas, BAR @ Gallery Cafe, April 4th 2014

Apr 6

Poets from Burn After Reading, preparing for their monthly event…



Poets from Burn After Reading, preparing for their monthly event at the Gallery Cafe (April 4th 2014)

Apr 5

Poet: Michelle Madsen, Burn After Reading at the Gallery Cafe,…



Poet: Michelle Madsen, Burn After Reading at the Gallery Cafe, July 2013 (by jsamlarose)

Apr 4

Poet: Emily Harrison, Burn After Reading at the Gallery Cafe,…



Poet: Emily Harrison, Burn After Reading at the Gallery Cafe, July 2013 (by jsamlarose)

Apr 3

Poet: Muj Hameed, Burn After Reading at the Gallery Cafe, July…



Poet: Muj Hameed, Burn After Reading at the Gallery Cafe, July 2013 (by jsamlarose)

Apr 2

Poet: Charlotte Higgins, Burn After Reading at the Gallery Cafe,…



Poet: Charlotte Higgins, Burn After Reading at the Gallery Cafe, July 2013 (by jsamlarose)

Apr 1

“Without discomfort your comfort becomes your main weakness. Change is uncomfortable and discomfort…”

“Without discomfort your comfort becomes your main weakness. Change is uncomfortable and discomfort is necessary for change. Change is possible, but it is never easy and it is never comfortable.”

- The Virtue of Discomfort - Jacob Lund Fisker
Apr 1

Poet: Will Tyas, Burn After Reading at the Gallery Cafe, July…



Poet: Will Tyas, Burn After Reading at the Gallery Cafe, July 2013 (by jsamlarose)

Mar 31